Booklist's Review of The Love Letters of Abelard & Lily

Lily, 16, struggles with ADHD. She hates her medication, but without it, she loses focus and has difficulty controlling her impulses. One of these impulses leads her to Abelard, a classmate with Asperger’s syndrome. They’re probably the only teens at their school who have read The Love Letters of Abelard and Heloise, and they begin a text correspondence in which they quote the book heavily. In fact, the text sessions seem better than some of their real-life encounters. As their relationship flourishes, Lily feels bound for eventual disaster. Abelard recognizes her best qualities, but his own issues create tension. When Lily thinks she is going to lose Abelard, she goes into full destructive mode, which, ironically, gets her headed in the right direction. Creedle’s debut novel is rich and thoughtful, and Lily, the first-person narrator, is feisty, funny, and introspective. Abelard’s portrayal dispels the erroneous notion that people with autism lack emotionLily’s best friend Rosalind, her overachieving younger sister Iris, and her mother are particularly realistic and effective foils to Lily’s turmoil.  — Donna Scanlon